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Does History Repeat Itself?

Why do we study history? History is an interpretive study. The human adventure of the past created the present. Voters get the government they deserve. History does repeat itself and that is sad.

In the previous post in this series Let’s Talk ‘Why Do We Still Have Gender Issues?’ I asked why, in the year 2017, do we still have unresolved gender issues. Why do women feel the need to band together to acquire that which is their due? Today, thanks to a post by JoAnn Chateau entitled ‘Ancient Greeks: Pythagoras on Repeating Patterns’, I am inspired to ponder the question of whether or not we learn from history. Continue reading “Does History Repeat Itself?”

John’s Believe It Or Not… June 26th

In 1959 – Queen Elizabeth II officially opens 318 km long St. Lawrence Seaway with US President Eisenhower. In 1948 U.S. begins Berlin Airlift. In 1807 Lightning strikes in Luxembourg. In 1945 U.N. Charter signed. In 1993 Clinton punishes Iraq for the plot to kill Bush.

Oh-Oh… It’s Monday! Did you know…

* 1959 – Queen Elizabeth II officially opens 318 km long St. Lawrence Seaway with US President Eisenhower. (The St Lawrence Seaway (Great Lakes Waterway) is the system of locks, canals, and channels linking the Great Lakes and the St Lawrence River with the Atlantic Ocean. The construction of progressively larger canals along the St Lawrence River began as early as 1783. By 1900, a complete network of shallow draft canals allowed uninterrupted navigation from Lake Superior to Montréal.

The waterway, some 3,700 km long from Île d’Anticosti to the head of Lake Superior, permits vessels of up to 225.5 m long, 23.8 m wide and a maximum draft (i.e., the distance between the top of the water and the bottom of the ship) of 8.1 m to sail from Montréal to Duluth, Minnesota, on Lake Superior. The majority of the cargo moving through the Seaway is iron ore, coal and other mine products, followed by agricultural goods, other bulk cargo (e.g., petroleum products and cement) and finished goods (e.g., iron and steel). Approximately 44 million tons of cargo moves through the Seaway annually, in contrast with the annual average of about 11 million tons in the 1950s.

Between 1913 and 1932, the Welland Canal (between Lakes Erie and Ontario) was rebuilt, but the United States was reluctant to enter a larger scheme, that is, to rebuild the Montréal–Lake Ontario channels. A threat by the Canadian government in 1951 to build a seaway entirely within Canadian territory resulted in a final agreement in 1954. Construction on the St Lawrence Seaway and Power Project began on 10 August 1954. In addition to the building of seven locks and deepening navigation channels to a depth of 8.2 m, the project also included the construction of the 2,090 megawatts Moses-Saunders Powerhouse near Cornwall, Ontario. The Seaway was opened to commercial traffic 25 April 1959. The official opening on 26 June 1959 was attended by Prime Minister John Diefenbaker, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Queen Elizabeth II.) Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… June 26th”

Views of the Neighborhood – Edinburgh Neighborhood

Author John W. Howell is visiting Scotland and his family roots – these are shots of Edinburgh. Please, enjoy the tour…

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Today’s views are of the neighborhood that I have been in since Monday.  There have been so many things to see and here is a sample of the city.

Edinburgh

The requisite view of the surrounding countryside as we come in for a landing.

Edinburgh

This is a shot of street where the apartment we stayed is located. The entrance is below grade through the gate which is just after the stairs.

Edinburgh

This is a view of Edinburgh taken from Calton Hill. It was taken at 9:45 pm and the sun was just beginning to set.

Edinburgh

This is a photo taken at Edinburg Castle. The young, serious, well dressed, military man is in charge of shooting the 1:00 cannon (which is done daily) which you can see in the background. The other guy looks like a writer or homeless person to me.

Edinburgh

This is a shot of the castle. The day was…

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John’s Believe It Or Not… June 25th

In 1968 – Pierre Trudeau wins a majority in the 28th federal general election. In 1678 Venetian Elena Cornaro Piscopia is the 1st woman to receive a university doctoral degree or PhD. In 1876 Battle of Little Bighorn. In 1950 Korean War begins. In 2009 “King of Pop” Michael Jackson dies at age 50.

It’s Sunday! Did you know…

* 1968 – Pierre Trudeau wins a majority in the 28th federal general election. (Trudeau, who was a relative unknown until he was appointed to the cabinet by Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson, had won a surprise victory over Paul Joseph James Martin, Paul Hellyer and Robert Winters in the party’s leadership election earlier in 1968. The charismatic, intellectual, handsome, single, and fully bilingual Trudeau soon captured the hearts and minds of the nation, and the period leading up to the election saw such intense feelings for him that it was dubbed “Trudeaumania.” At public appearances, he was confronted by screaming girls, something never before seen in Canadian politics.

The Liberal campaign was dominated by Trudeau’s personality. Liberal campaign ads featured pictures of Trudeau inviting Canadians to “Come work with me”, and encouraged them to “Vote for New Leadership for All of Canada”. The substance of the campaign was based on the creation of a “just society”, with a proposed expansion of social programs.

This was the first Canadian federal election to hold a leaders debate, on June 9, 1968. The debate included Trudeau, Stanfield, Douglas, and in the latter part Réal Caouette, with Caouette speaking French and Trudeau alternating between the languages. The assassination of Robert F. Kennedy three days before cast a pall over the proceedings, and the stilted format was generally seen as boring and inconclusive.

The results of the election were sealed when on the night before the election a riot broke out at the St. Jean Baptiste Day parade in Montreal. Protesting the prime minister’s attendance at the parade, supporters of Quebec independence yelled Trudeau au poteau [Trudeau to the gallows] and threw bottles and rocks. Trudeau, whose lack of military service during World War II had led some to question his courage, firmly stood his ground and did not flee from the violence despite the wishes of his security escort. Images of Trudeau standing fast to the thrown bottles of the rioters were broadcast across the country and swung the election even further in the Liberals’ favor as many English-speaking Canadians believed that he would be the right leader to fight the threat of Quebec separatism.) Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… June 25th”

John’s Believe It Or Not… June 24th

In 1497 – John Cabot From Bristol Claims America for England. In 1509 Henry VIII is crowned King of England in Westminster Abbey. In 1997 U.S. Air Force reports on Roswell. In 1675 King Philip’s War begins. In 1901 Picasso exhibited in Paris.

Yay! It’s Saturday! Did you know…

* 1497 – John Cabot From Bristol Claims America for England. (Italian sailor and explorer John Cabot was born Giovanni Caboto around 1450. In 1497, Cabot traveled by sea to Canada, where he made a claim to land for England, mistaking the North American land for Asia.

Cabot was the son of a spice merchant, Giulio Caboto, in Genoa. At age 11, his family moved to Venice, where he learned sailing and navigation from Italian seamen and merchants. In 1474, John Cabot married a girl named Mattea and eventually became the father of three sons: Ludovico, Sancto, and Sebastiano. Sebastiano would later follow in his father’s footsteps, becoming an explorer in his own right.

In 1476, Cabot officially became a Venetian citizen and began conducting trade in the eastern Mediterranean. Records indicate that he got into financial trouble and left Venice as a debtor in November 1488. During this time, Cabot became inspired by the discoveries of Bartolomeu Dias and Christopher Columbus. Like Columbus, Cabot believed that sailing west from Europe was the shorter route to Asia. Hearing of opportunities in England, Cabot traveled there and met with King Henry VII, who gave him a grant to “seeke out, discover, and finde” new lands for England.

In early May of 1497, Cabot left Bristol, England, on the Matthew, a fast and able ship weighing 50 tons, with a crew of 18 men. Cabot and his crew sailed west and north under Cabot’s belief that the route to Asia would be shorter from northern Europe than Columbus’s voyage along the trade winds. On June 24, 1497, 50 days into the voyage, Cabot landed on the east coast of North America, though the precise location of this landing is subject to controversy. Some historians believe that Cabot landed at Cape Breton Island or mainland Nova Scotia. Others believe he may have landed at Newfoundland, Labrador or even Maine.) Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… June 24th”

“Glimpses Across The Barricades” #Poetry in progress. ‘In Dreams of A Perfect World’ by Suzanne Burke.

Author and poet Suzanne Burke gifts us with another poetic gem born of her life experiences, blooming in her heart, and emanating from her soul. Please, read on…

Welcome to the World of Suzanne Burke.

Welcome to ‘Glimpses Across the Barricades’ This poem was included in the epilogue of my book “Faint Echoes of Laughter”.

In A  Perfect World

by

Suzanne Burke

Dreams of aperfect world image

As I lay snugly warm and safe
Within my families womb
My heart begins a slow sad ache
For another child will cry tonight
Another child will die tonight
What was once their home
will become their tomb

Anger tears me as I read
The desperate plead of a child in need
How can we continue to ignore
The deafening cries from every land?
Can the balance be restored or
Are we so desensitized to pain
That we can’t give
Without thought of gain

If I had but one wish to make
Then that wish would surely be
That when my own sweet child has grown,
and if fate so decrees

I’ll hold her own children on my knee
And when I lay them…

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John’s Believe It Or Not… June 23rd

In 1868 Christopher Latham Sholes patents the “Typewriter”. In 1992 Teflon Don sentenced to life. In 1934 Even without the corpse – a murderer is uncovered. In 2013 Wallenda makes Grand Canyon crossing on a high wire. In 1987 Tiffany visits the mall on her way to stardom.

It’s Friday – TGIF! Did you know…

* 1868 Christopher Latham Sholes patents the “Typewriter”.  (The idea behind the typewriter was to apply the concept of movable type developed by Johann Gutenberg in the invention of the printing press century to a machine for individual use. Descriptions of such mechanical writing machines date to the early eighteenth century. In 1714, a patent something like a typewriter was granted to a man named Henry Mill in England, but no example of Mills’ invention survives.

In 1829, William Burt from Detroit, Michigan patented his typographer which had characters arranged on a rotating frame. However, Burt’s machine and many of those that followed it were cumbersome, hard to use, unreliable and often took longer to produce a letter than writing it by hand.
Finally, in 1867, a Milwaukee, Wisconsin printer-publisher-politician named Christopher Latham Sholes, with assistance from Carlos Glidden and Samuel Soule, patented what was to be the first useful typewriter. He licensed his patent to Remington & Sons of Ilion, New York, a noted American gun maker. In 1874, the Remington Model 1, the first commercial typewriter, was placed on the market.

Based on Sholes’ mechanical typewriter, the first electric typewriter was built by Thomas Alva Edison in the United States in 1872, but the widespread use of electric typewriters was not common until the 1950s.

The electronic typewriter, a typewriter with an electronic “memory” capable of storing text, first appeared in 1978. It was developed independently by the Olivetti Company in Italy and the Casio Company in Japan.) Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… June 23rd”

New Serial Reveal — Truths Unseen 1

Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene is a gifted writer who has gifted us with a brand new serial. Please, treat yourself and read on…

Teagan's Books

Girl Truths Unseen 1Unsplash, Steinar Engeland

Last time I put it to a vote — should I do something darkly different from my other blog stories.  Almost everyone said yes.  Although the story is “there,” I’m still not sure I can write it.  The telling is difficult.

Sigh… Okay, here goes nothing!

Even though sunshine is sorely absent from this story — and the content will sometimes be raw and difficult, as a writer I’m still not given to extremes. You need not expect gore, violence, sex, or profanity in excess.  Although there likely will be some.  Those things exist in this story, even if I don’t go into explicit detail with them.

I need the sunlight. That’s why I haven’t been able to start this dank, dark, deplorable diatribe.  It’s not a fantasy, though it may bear little semblance to the worlds any of you have known.  For your sake, I certainly hope it does…

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