John’s Believe It Or Not… April 29th

John Fioravanti Stands at the front of his classroom in 2006

Happy Saturday! Did you know…

* 1429 Joan of Arc relieves Orleans. (During the Hundred Years’ War, the 17-year-old French peasant Joan of Arc leads a French force in relieving the city of Orleans, besieged by the English since October. At the age of 16, “voices” of Christian saints told Joan to aid Charles, the French dauphin, in gaining the French throne and expelling the English from France. Convinced of the validity of her divine mission, Charles furnished Joan with a small force of troops. She led her troops to Orleans, and on April 29, as a French sortie distracted the English troops on the west side of the city, Joan entered unopposed by its eastern gate. Bringing needed supplies and troops into the besieged city, she also inspired the French to a passionate resistance and through the next week led the charge during a number of skirmishes and battles. On one occasion, she was even hit by an arrow, but after dressing her wounds she returned to the battle. On May 8, the siege of Orleans was broken, and the English retreated.)

Jeanne d'Arc entering Orléans on 29 April 1429. Painting by Scherrer (c.1870).
Jeanne d’Arc entering Orléans on 29 April 1429. Painting by Scherrer (c.1870).

* 1945 Dachau liberated. (On April 29, 1945, the U.S. Seventh Army’s 45th Infantry Division liberates Dachau, the first concentration camp established by Germany’s Nazi regime. A major Dachau subcamp was liberated the same day by the 42nd Rainbow Division. Prisoners at Dachau were used as forced laborers, initially in the construction and expansion of the camp and later for German armaments production. The camp served as the training center for SS concentration camp guards and was a model for other Nazi concentration camps. Dachau was also the first Nazi camp to use prisoners as human guinea pigs in medical experiments. At Dachau, Nazi scientists tested the effects of freezing and changes to atmospheric pressure on inmates, infected them with malaria and tuberculosis and treated them with experimental drugs, and forced them to test methods of making seawater potable and of halting excessive bleeding. Hundreds of prisoners died or were crippled as a result of these experiments. As they neared the camp, the Americans found more than 30 railroad cars filled with bodies in various states of decomposition. Inside the camp, there were more bodies and 30,000 survivors, most severely emaciated. Some of the American troops who liberated Dachau were so appalled by conditions at the camp that they machine-gunned at least two groups of captured German guards. It is officially reported that 30 SS guards were killed in this fashion, but conspiracy theorists have alleged that more than 10 times that number were executed by the American liberators. The German citizens of the town of Dachau were later forced to bury the 9,000 dead inmates found at the camp. In the course of Dachau’s history, at least 160,000 prisoners passed through the main camp, and 90,000 through the subcamps. Incomplete records indicate that at least 32,000 of the inmates perished at Dachau and its subcamps, but countless more were shipped to extermination camps elsewhere.)

18 newspaper reporters view corpses at Dachau, May 3, 1945
18 newspaper reporters view corpses at Dachau, May 3, 1945

* 1854 First African-American college chartered. (By an act of the Pennsylvania legislature, Ashmun Institute, the first college founded solely for African-American students, is officially chartered. Established in the rolling farmlands of southern Chester County, Pennsylvania, Ashmun Institute was named after Jehudi Ashmun, the U.S. agent who helped reorganize and preserve the struggling African-American colony in Africa that later grew into the independent nation of Liberia. The Ashmun Institute, chartered to give theological, classical, and scientific training to African Americans, opened on January 1, 1857, and John Pym Carter served as the college’s first president. In 1866, the institution was renamed Lincoln University.)

Lincoln University sign with a brief history

* 1968 Hair premieres on Broadway. (In a year marked by as much social and cultural upheaval as 1968, it was understandable that the New York Times review of a controversial musical newly arrived on Broadway would describe the show in political terms. “You probably don’t have to be a supporter of Eugene McCarthy to love it,” wrote critic Clive Barnes, “but I wouldn’t give it much chance among the adherents of Governor Reagan.” The show in question was Hair, the now-famous “tribal love-rock musical” that introduced the era-defining song “Aquarius” and gave New York theatergoers a full-frontal glimpse of the burgeoning 60s-counterculture esthetic. Hair premiered on Broadway on April 29, 1968. It turned out that these potentially shocking breaks from Broadway tradition turned didn’t turn off-Broadway audiences at all. Hair quickly became not just a smash-hit show, but a genuine cultural phenomenon that spawned a million-selling original cast recording and a #1 song on the pop charts for the Fifth Dimension. Forty years after its initial downtown opening, Charles Isherwood, writing for the New York Times, placed Hair in its proper historical context: “For darker, knottier and more richly textured sonic experiences of the times, you turn to the Doors or Bob Dylan or Joni Mitchell or Jimi Hendrix or Janis Joplin. Or all of them. For an escapist dose of the sweet sound of youth brimming with hope that the world is going to change tomorrow, you listen to Hair and let the sunshine in.”)

* 2011 Britain’s Prince William weds Kate Middleton. (On this day in 2011, Great Britain’s Prince William marries his longtime girlfriend Catherine Elizabeth “Kate” Middleton at Westminster Abbey in London. Some 1,900 guests attended the ceremony, while another 1 million spectators lined the streets of London and an estimated 2 billion people around the world watched on television. The 29-year-old bride and 28-year-old groom, second in line (behind his father) to the throne, met in 2001 as students at the University of St. Andrews in Fife, Scotland. Middleton, the eldest of three children, was raised in the English village of Bucklebury. Her parents, former flight attendants, became millionaires running a successful party-supply business. Middleton majored in art history at St. Andrews and went on to do a stint as an accessories buyer for a British clothing chain. Prince William, the elder of two sons born to Charles, Prince of Wales and Diana, Princess of Wales, embarked on a military career after college, eventually becoming a helicopter search-and-rescue pilot with the Royal Air Force (RAF). His parent’s lavish 1981 wedding was a media sensation witnessed by a global television estimated as high as 750 million; however, in December 1992, it was announced the couple was separating. The couple, who publicly admitted to infidelities during their marriage, officially divorced in 1996. Diana died in a car crash in Paris the following year.)

British royal Prince William and his bride, Catherine, leave Westminster Abbey in London

Look who was born on this date!

Head shot of Duke Ellington* Duke Ellington in 1899. (He was an American composer, pianist, and bandleader of a jazz orchestra, which he led from 1923 until his death in a career spanning over fifty years. Though widely considered to have been a pivotal figure in the history of jazz, Ellington embraced the phrase “beyond category” as a liberating principle, and referred to his music as part of the more general category of American Music, rather than to a musical genre such as jazz.)

Head shot of Willie Nelson* Willie Nelson in 1933. (American Country Singer:  An American country music singer and songwriter, Willie Nelson is also an author, poet, actor, and activist. The critical success of the album Shotgun Willie (1973), combined with commercial successes of Red Headed Stranger (1975) and Stardust (1978), made Nelson one of the most recognized artists in country music. He was one of the main figures of outlaw country, a subgenre of country music that developed in the late 1960s in reaction to the conservative restrictions of the Nashville sound. Nelson has acted in over 30 films, co-authored several books, and been involved in activism for the use of biofuels and the legalization of marijuana.)

Head shot of Seinfeld* Jerry Seinfeld in 1954. (American Comedian: Seinfeld began his career as a stand-up comedian before creating the TV sitcom “Seinfield” with Larry David in 1988. The show (1989-98) in which Seinfeld played a caricature of himself became one of the most popular sitcoms ever in America. The comedy was famously called “a show about nothing” and was the winner of a Grammy (1993) and a Golden Globe (1994).

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Author: John Fioravanti

I'm a retired History teacher (35 years), husband, father of three, grandfather of three. My wife, Anne, and I became business partners in December, 2013, and launched our own publishing company, Fiora Books (http://fiorabooks.com), to publish my books. We have been married since 1973 and hope our joint business venture will be as successful as our marriage.

11 thoughts on “John’s Believe It Or Not… April 29th”

    1. Thanks for stopping by today, John. It is disheartening that the Holocaust was not the last horrific act recorded in human history. I’m not a violent person and I don’t easily condone violence, but I felt some satisfaction in reading that some American soldiers summarily executed a number of SS guards when these camps were liberated. I clenched my fist and whispered “YES!” in response. That’s sad too.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. The story of Joan of Arc was one of my favourites as a child. I am also a fan or the Royal Family. I watched William and Kate’s wedding on TV but don’t have any memorabilia. I do have a mug and wall plate from the memorabilia on sale at the time of Charles and Diana’s wedding however. Another intersting post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Kim. Joan is a fascinating historical character – another woman (child really) who explodes that tiresome stereotype of the ‘weaker sex’. Strength of personality, leadership ability, intelligence, wisdom, etc. all have absolutely nothing to do with one’s gender. I need to do a post on that topic…

      Liked by 1 person

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