John’s Believe It Or Not … May 2nd

John Fioravanti Stands at the front of his classroom in 2006

It’s Tremendous Tuesday! Did you know…

* 1670 – Charles II grants Royal Charter to Prince Rupert and the Hudson’s Bay Company. (King Charles II grants a Royal Charter to his cousin Prince Rupert and a group of investors called The Governor and Company of Adventurers of England trading into Hudson’s Bay: today’s Hudson’s Bay Company. Two French explorers and traders, Pierre-Esprit Radisson and Médard des Groseilliers, proposed the fur-trading company to the group and mounted a successful season of trade a year earlier. The charter gives the company the exclusive monopoly of commerce in lands flowing into Hudson Bay and requires them to search for mines and a route to the South Seas. In exchange, the Company had to pay ‘two Elkes and two Black beavers’ to the King whenever he or his successors visit the territory (a payment that has been made only four times in the Company’s history). In 1859, the HBC’s exclusive trade license expires, and in 1869, the Company agrees to surrender its Rupert’s Land rights to the Crown. In 1870, Manitoba and later the Northwest Territories become part of the new country of Canada. Can anyone tell me the translation of the HBC motto?)

HBC Logo

* 1933 Loch Ness Monster sighted. (Although accounts of an aquatic beast living in Scotland’s Loch Ness date back 1,500 years, the modern legend of the Loch Ness Monster is born when a sighting makes local news on May 2, 1933. The newspaper Inverness Courier related an account of a local couple who claimed to have seen “an enormous animal rolling and plunging on the surface.” The story of the “monster” (a moniker chosen by the Courier editor) became a media phenomenon, with London newspapers sending correspondents to Scotland and a circus offering a 20,000 pounds sterling reward for the capture of the beast.)

Picture of Nessie

* 1972 End of an era at the FBI. (After nearly five decades as director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), J. Edgar Hoover dies, leaving the powerful government agency without the administrator who had been largely responsible for its existence and shape. By the time Hoover entered service under his eighth president in 1969, the media, the public, and Congress had grown suspicious that the FBI might be abusing its authority. For the first time in his bureaucratic career, Hoover endured widespread criticism, and Congress responded by passing laws requiring Senate confirmation of future FBI directors and limiting their tenure to 10 years. On May 2, 1972, with the Watergate affair about to explode onto the national stage, J. Edgar Hoover died of heart disease at the age of 77. The Watergate affair subsequently revealed that the FBI had illegally protected President Richard Nixon from an investigation, and the agency was thoroughly investigated by Congress. Revelations of the FBI’s abuses of power and unconstitutional surveillance motivated Congress and the media to become more vigilant in future monitoring of the FBI.)

J. Edgar Hoover

* 2011 Osama bin Laden killed by U.S. forces. (On this day in 2011, Osama bin Laden, the mastermind behind the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in the United States, is killed by U.S. forces during a raid on his compound hideout in Pakistan. The notorious, 54-year-old leader of Al Qaeda, the terrorist network of Islamic extremists, had been the target of a nearly decade-long international manhunt. The raid began around 1 a.m. local time when 23 U.S. Navy SEALs in two Black Hawk helicopters descended on the compound in Abbottabad, a tourist and military center north of Pakistan’s capital, Islamabad. One of the helicopters crash-landed into the compound but no one aboard was hurt. During the raid, which lasted approximately 40 minutes, five people, including bin Laden and one of his adult sons, were killed by U.S. gunfire. No Americans were injured in the assault. Afterward, bin Laden’s body was flown by helicopter to Afghanistan for official identification, then buried at an undisclosed location in the Arabian Sea less than 24 hours after his death, in accordance with Islamic practice.)

ABBOTTABAD, PAKISTAN - MAY 3: People gather outside Osama Bin Laden's compound, where he was killed during a raid by U.S. special forces, May 3, 2011 in Abottabad, Pakistan. Bin Laden was killed during a U.S. military mission May 2, at the compound.
ABBOTTABAD, PAKISTAN – MAY 3: People gather outside Osama Bin Laden’s compound, where he was killed during a raid by U.S. special forces, May 3, 2011 in Abottabad, Pakistan. Bin Laden was killed during a U.S. military mission May 2, at the compound.

* 1939 Gehrig ends streak. (On May 2, 1939, New York Yankees first baseman Lou Gehrig benches himself for poor play and ends his streak of consecutive games played at 2,130. “The Iron Horse” was suffering at the time from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), now known as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease.” Gehrig’s offensive output was as extraordinary as his consecutive games streak. The left-handed slugger led the American League in RBIs five times, driving in at least 100 runs 13 years in a row. He led the AL in home runs three times, led in runs four times and led the league in hitting once. In the Yankees first golden era, Gehrig batted cleanup, right after Babe Ruth, the bigger star of the two. It was Gehrig, however, who was named American League MVP in 1927, on a Yankee team considered the greatest team in history; he won the award again in 1936, another championship year for the Yankees. In all, Gehrig won six World Series titles with the Yankees. Gehrig began to experience symptoms of ALS during the 1938 season, but doctors initially struggled to diagnose him. He played the first eight games of 1939, removing himself mid-game after being congratulated for a routine play at first base. He sat the next day, ending his streak at 2,130 games played. He never played again.)

Gehrig sitting in the team dugout.

 

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Author: John Fioravanti

I'm a retired History teacher (35 years), husband, father of three, grandfather of three. My wife, Anne, and I became business partners in December, 2013, and launched our own publishing company, Fiora Books (http://fiorabooks.com), to publish my books. We have been married since 1973 and hope our joint business venture will be as successful as our marriage.

7 thoughts on “John’s Believe It Or Not … May 2nd”

    1. J. Edgar Hoover was a force to be reckoned with, Robbie. He gathered information (secrets) about powerful people so he could control them. As with any organization, it reflects the person in charge. Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

      Liked by 1 person

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