How to Correctly Punctuate Dialogue for Novels

Punctuation rules for dialog? Here’s a primer provided by author S. Katherine Anthony that is solid and rife with helpful examples! Please, read on!

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7 Tips for Writing a Book Blurb

Frustrated writing book blurbs? Join the club! S. Katherine Anthony gifts us with some solid advice and an illustrated example. Please, read on…

Infographic: How to stay productive when you’re tired

Kim Cox thoughtfully provides us author types with an infographic that suggests some practical strategies we can use to stay productive when fatigue sets in. Please, read on…

Kim's Author Support Blog


How to stay productive when you're tired

How to stay productive when you’re tired [Infographic] by the team at STL

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Weaving History into Contemporary Fiction—RRBC Tour Stop

Author Staci Troilo gifts us with a lucid explanation and practical examples about using research in your stories. Please, read on…

Staci Troilo

RRBC Springtime Book and Blog Party Hi! Welcome to Rave Reviews Book Club’sSpring Book & Block Party. (For all the stops and oodles of chances to win a myriad of prizes, check out all the RRBC posts throughout the month-long tour.)

This stop? Staci Troilo’s site currently hosted in Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA.

Today I’m Giving Prizes to Two Lucky Winners:

First Prize: $15 Amazon Gift Card
Second Prize: Medici Protectorate SWAG Pack

Medici Protectorate SWAGSWAG Pack Contains: 1 Pen, 1 Magnet, 1 Bookmark, & 1 Sticky Note Pad

Prizes awarded to US commenters only.


Today I want to talk about weaving history into contemporary stories. I like a good historical tale every once in a while, but I tend to read contemporary fiction a lot more often. That doesn’t mean history has to be abandoned, though.

One of my favorite things to do is research. I used to love writing research papers in school. Sure, I…

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Listening To Your Manuscript

Terry Odell presents an interesting article about the aural factor that needs to be part of the editing process. Please, read on…

Kobo Writing Life

by Terry Odell

As authors, we want to provide the best possible experience for our readers. That means providing a well-edited book, and I don’t put anything out there that hasn’t been run past my critique partners, beta readers, and a professional editor. The more eyes on the manuscript, the better. But I’ve learned you need ears on the manuscript as well.

A couple years ago, I started putting my books out in audio, and as part of that process, I had to listen to the narrations to make sure there were no errors. That drove home the point that I should have read my work out loud before submitting it.

Skipping the ‘read it out loud’ editing pass means you’re going to miss things.

Heck, even when you do read it out loud, you can still miss things, because your eye sees what’s supposed to be on the page…

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