John’s Believe It Or Not… July 24th

* 1917 – Borden’s union government passes Military Service Bill (Conscription Act). * 1911 Machu Picchu discovered. * 1901 O. Henry is released from prison. * 1982 “Eye Of The Tiger” from Rocky III tops the U.S. pop charts. * 1998 Saving Private Ryan opens in theaters

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It’s Tuesday! Did You Know…

* 1917 – Borden’s union government passes Military Service Bill (Conscription Act).

The Military Service Act of 1917 was a controversial law allowing the conscription of Canadian men for service in the final years of the First World War. Although politically explosive, the Act had questionable military value: only 24,132 conscripted men made it to the battlefields of the Western Front, compared to the more than 400,000 who volunteered throughout the war. Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… July 24th”

Cognitive dissonance prevents further unraveling

In this important and thought-provoking article, Keith suggests that bridging the gap between people of differing beliefs and views can be achieved only by thoughtful and respectful dialogue. Please share.

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I have been using the analogy of a wound ball of yarn unraveling to describe what is happening with Trump voters. The outer layers represent the more moderate and rational voters who have seen what Trump represents and their support is unraveling. As the ball gets smaller, the unraveling becomes more difficult as the yarn is coated with cognitive dissonance.

One dictionary defines cognitive dissonance as “the state of having inconsistent thoughts, beliefs, or attitudes, especially as relating to behavioral decisions and attitude change.” A definition I hold is calling the dissonance a “disharmony” that is upsetting to the person as it is at odds with what they believe.

When a person is confronted with facts that diminish their belief, they often run home to some source of information to tell them the facts are not true. This is s key reason people like watching pseudo-news sources that tell them…

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John’s Believe It Or Not… July 23rd

* 1983 – Gimli Glider – Air Canada 767 runs out of fuel in midair. * 1984 Miss America resigns. * 1967 Detroit Riots Begin. * 1982 Actor and two children killed on Twilight Zone set. * 1988 Guns N’ Roses make popular breakthrough with “Sweet Child O’ Mine”.

It’s Monday! Did You Know…

* 1983 – Gimli Glider – Air Canada 767 runs out of fuel in midair. 

Air Canada admitted that its Boeing 767 jet ran out of fuel in mid-flight because of two mistakes in figuring the fuel supply of the airline’s first aircraft to use metric measurements.

After both engines lost their power, the pilots made what is now thought to be the first successful emergency ”dead stick” landing of a commercial jetliner. Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… July 23rd”

John’s Believe It Or Not… July 20th

* 1629 – David & Thomas Kirke force Samuel de Champlain to surrender his fur fort at Québec. * 1969 Armstrong walks on moon. * 1881 Sitting Bull surrenders. * 1976 Viking 1 lands on Mars. * 1963 Jan and Dean’s “Surf City” hits #1

It’s Friday! TGIF! Did You Know…

* 1629 – David & Thomas Kirke force Samuel de Champlain to surrender his fur fort at Québec.

The surrender of Quebec in 1629 was the taking of Quebec City, during the Anglo-French War (1627-29). It was achieved without battle by English privateers led by David Kirke, who had intercepted the town’s supplies.

It began in 1627 with David Kirke’s father when several London merchants formed the Company of Adventurers to Canada to develop trade and settlement for profit on the Saint Lawrence River. Made up of private investors, it was chartered by the Crown as a means of extending English influence in exploration and colonial development. When the Anglo-French War broke out later that year, the Company financed an expedition, which was commissioned by Charles I of England, to displace the French from “Canida”. The French had settlements along the Saint Lawrence River. Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… July 20th”

John’s Believe It Or Not… July 19th

* 1701 – Cadillac arrives at Detroit with a fleet of settlers. * 1799 Rosetta Stone found. * 1979 Oil tankers collide in Caribbean Sea. * 1848 Seneca Falls Convention begins. * 2003 Thousands of fans join the Miami funeral procession of Celia Cruz.

It’s Thursday! Did You Know…

* 1701 – Cadillac arrives at Detroit with a fleet of settlers.

Antoine Laumet, dit de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac 1658-1730, soldier, explorer, and French colonial Governor, born March 5, 1658 at Les Laumets, Saint-Nicolas-de-la-Grave, Gascony, France, the son of Jean Laumet, an assistant magistrate in the local court; died October 15, 1730 at Castelsarrasin, France. Cadillac is educated in a military school, then joins the regiment of Dampierre-Lorraine. Legend says he possessed a very long nose that supposedly inspired Edmond Rostand’s play, Cyrano de Bergerac, and that he inspired King Louis XIV with his wit, courage, honesty, and swordsmanship. He was sent to New France to work under Governor Frontenac as investigator for the king, reporting on corruption in the colony. Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… July 19th”

John’s Believe It Or Not… July 18th

* 1814 – Eight traitors captured during the War of 1812 are hanged at Ancaster – Upper Canada.  * 2012 Kim Jong-un is officially appointed Supreme Leader of North Korea and given the rank of Marshal in the Korean People’s Army. * 64 Nero’s Rome burns * 1986 Video of Titanic wreckage released * 1995 Barack Obama’s “Dreams from My Father” is published

It’s Hump Day Wednesday! Did You Know…

* 1814 – Eight traitors captured during the War of 1812 are hanged at Ancaster – Upper Canada.

We like to think that we were removed from barbarian practices of the middle ages, perhaps not quite so removed. An incident in Canada during the War of 1812 saw men’s heads lopped off and paraded on spikes.

At the beginning of the war, Americans thought Canadians would welcome their invading troops as liberators from British rule. They were eventually awakened to a much different reality. Still, there were Americans who had moved north and some Canadians who were sympathetic to the American ideal and others who were indifferent to the Empire and might be persuaded to the American cause. Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… July 18th”

John’s Believe It Or Not… July 17th

* 1976 – Queen Elizabeth II officially opens the Montréal Olympic Games. * 1955 Disneyland opens * 1938 “Wrong Way” Corrigan crosses the Atlantic * 1975 Superpowers meet in space * 1996 Flight 800 explodes over Long Island

It’s Tuesday! Did You Know…

* 1976 – Queen Elizabeth II officially opens the Montréal Olympic Games.

In 1976, Montréal became the first Canadian city to host the Olympic Games. The XXIst Olympiad, held from 17 July to 1 August 1976, included memorable performances from many athletes, including Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci and American decathlete Bruce Jenner. Although Canada did not win a gold medal at the Games, the Canadian team won 11 medals in total —more than double the number of medals won at each of the previous two Olympic Games. The Olympic facilities, while costly, became Montréal landmarks and many are still used for training and competition. Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… July 17th”